“All made o’ squirmin’ ropes… sort o’ shaped like a hen’s egg bigger’n anything … nothin’ solid abaout it … great bulgin’ eyes all over it… ten or twenty maouths or trunks a-stickin’ aout all along the sides, big as stove-pipes an all a-tossin’ an openin’ an’ shuttin’… all grey, with kinder blue or purple rings… an’ Gawd it Heaven – that haff face on top…” – H.P. Lovecraft, The Dunwich Horror

 
Few writers managed to evoke so much terror and revulsion about their creations as Lovecraft. He did more with less. Most of his creatures were never described, or at least not in detail. However, if we’re to use them in D&D we need to give them details, stats, and abilities. I’ve spent some time working on creating various Lovecraftian invaders for my campaign which slip into the world through rifts, gliding in from unspeakable regions between worlds for unknowable purposes.

There are many monsters in D&D (most are Abberations) which owe at least a little to Lovecraft’s influence. Today I’ve borrowed the beholder and repurposed it as a nameless entity which wields mysterious powers. It is not meant to be a boss creature, rather it is supposed to be a bizarre, terrifying and evocative encounter. In my world these creatures will methodically drive all the inhabitants in a town insane, causing horrific acts of violence among peaceful townsfolk before folding the town out of existence completely, transporting all the lost souls to an unreachable hell beyond the known planes.

Unnameable Horror (Large)
HP: 101 (10 HD)
Speed: 30′ fly (perfect)
AC: 16 touch 10 flatfooted 15 (-1 size, +1 Dex, +6 natural)
Attacks: Bite +8 / Grapple +12
Full attack: Bite +8 damage 1d8+3
Saves: Fort +10 / Reflex +4 / Will +14
Abilities: Str 16, Dex 12, Con 18, Int 22, Wis 16, Cha 16
 
Gliding from the alley is a horror out of nightmares. Its shape is at first incomprehensible and twisted. Nothing supports its lazy, bloated bulk and it floats in perfect silence. Its outline writhes, defying attempts to determine its shape. One giant eye stares at you with otherwordly intelligence. A mouth of tangled teeth opens below the eye, gently dribbling mucous. Squirming tentacles frame its visage, each disturbingly ending in an eye.
 
A sense of deep and alien malevolence emanates from the eye. Around you the brilliant yellow and orange light twists and leaps, and the buildings yaw at impossible angles. Shadows flow across the street. It feels like the real world is spiralling away.

 
(All powers are considered supernatural)
Maddening Gaze: (no save) All creatures in the frontal arc of the creature (150′) suffer -5 to Will saving throws.
 
Warp Reality: Any creature passing through a doorway or opening within 150′ of the creature suffers a maze effect as distorted geometry flings them into a nightmarish world of never-ending doors and alleys.
 
Impossible Geometry: The creature may use dimension door as part of a move action (self only, 150′ range).
 
Special attacks: Each round for every opponent within 150′ and line of sight, the creature applies a power chosen randomly from the table below by rolling a d8. A DC 18 Will save negates (this save is Charisma based).

  1. Space distorts around the target as it moves, causing light to shimmer and bend as ripples of twisted space encase the target. The target is affected by slow (5 round duration).
  2. The target’s mind is briefly exposed to insane secrets normally hidden from mortals. The psychic shock dimishes the sense of self, inflicting 1d6 points of Charisma damage.
  3. Mad psychic whisperings plague the target’s thoughts, causing confusion for one round.
  4. The creature lashes out with mental energy, causing 2d8 damage and dazing the target.
  5. The target’s sense of time shifts nauseatingly. It repeats on its next turn whatever action it just took.
  6. The target becomes completely unstuck from the flow of time and irreversibly ages 1d6 years.
  7. The creature creates a psychic bridge between the target’s mind and the madness behind reality, causing 1 point of damage to all of the target’s mental stats per round as long as the target remains within 150′.
  8. Exposed to the impossible geometry and mind shattering madness surrounding the creature, the target becomes exhausted (moves at half speed, -6 penalty to Str and Dex, cannot run or charge).

Immunities: Because its mind is so alien and its thought processes incomprehensibly labyrinthine to mortals, the creature is immune to all mind-influencing effects (charms, compulsions, phantasms, patterns and morale effects). Any effect that would attempt to discern its thoughts automatically fails and the caster is effected by a confusion effect (Will DC 18 negates, 5 round duration).
 
Tactics:
The horror is extremely intelligent. However, it has goals and methods beyond mortal ken, and therefore will often take actions which do not seem to be the most tactically sound. Above all, it never retreats.
 
The creature prefers to fight from medium range and among some kind of structures or buildings, using alleys and streets to force its opponents to remain in its frontal arc (and suffer -5 to Will saves). It fights near openings to increase the chances foes will suffer from its maze effect. At the end of each turn it will often move out of sight and then use dimension door. This means opponents often don’t learn about its teleportation ability for several rounds.

 
I built the creature this way because I want the combat to be evocative and horrifying, but not necessarily deadly. If the party can find a way to corner the creature and get a few full attacks in, it will drop quickly. After all, it’s a slow moving squishy bag from a nameless dimension. However, before the players learn this they will find themselves subjected to all manner of effects completely different from what they are used to fighting, and this should unsettle them greatly. The first time a player is told they age 1d6 years, they will often pause and reconsider their opponent.

If you really want to be cruel, instead of rolling randomly for offensive powers each round, have the creature choose. I don’t take responsibility for the consequences however!

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